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"Greket" antik ?

Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2014 11:49 pm
by Arbëri
Thuan qe eshte gjetur ne Avganistan , i takon ne shekullit 3 para eres sone ne gjuhen greke eshte e shkruar !
Sa eshte e vertete e din kush ?

Filippo Canali de Rossi, Iscrizioni dello estremo oriente greco, Bonn, 2004, 269-270.
de-rossi1.jpg

Re: "Greket" antik ?

Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2014 11:57 pm
by Arbëri
Dhe cili eshte shkrimi me i vjeter ne gjuhen e lashte greke ?
Falemnderit .

Re: "Greket" antik ?

Posted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 11:49 pm
by Arbëri
Arbëri wrote:Thuan qe eshte gjetur ne Avganistan , i takon ne shekullit 3 para eres sone ne gjuhen greke eshte e shkruar !
Sa eshte e vertete e din kush ?

Filippo Canali de Rossi, Iscrizioni dello estremo oriente greco, Bonn, 2004, 269-270.
de-rossi1.jpg
Me duket qe kjo faqe ka lidhje me kete autor dhe nese ka mundesi dikush qe e kupton me mire gjuhen angleze ta beje nje perkthim te shkurter sepse dyshoj qe i takon asaj kohe qe thot autori :
The transcriptions are presented in a font sufficiently large to be easily scanned. Underdots were not used by the publisher, and very occasionally the placement of square brackets is questionable; the clarity of the illustrations, though, allows us to form our own opinion on the accuracy and reliability of the readings. There is, for example, what appears to be an alphabet of Greek letters on bricks from the fortification wall at Samarkand, represented in the transcription as a regular sequential ordering of the characters, though the illustration indicates that additional characters were included and that some of the Greek letters were in fact transposed (no. 389; cf. no. 275). In most cases, however, objections to the readings are a question of aesthetics, and at no time are the transcriptions or the placement of brackets and the supplements a cause for significant concern.

Italian translations of the Greek text are sporadically provided. Neither those texts whose Greek is particularly difficult and elaborate nor those texts of apparent historical importance and interest are consistently translated. Such texts are occasionally translated, but not regularly. On the other hand, some texts whose Greek is clear and straightforward are translated for no apparent reason.

Non-Hellenic inscriptions, when presented, are often translated. These non-Hellenic inscriptions, however, present an inconsistency. In a survey of inscriptions from the far Greek East, it is natural that many non-Greek texts should appear. Thus, it is no surprise that De Rossi should present several texts from Babylon and Bactria written in the indigenous languages with the Greek alphabet (cat. nos. 117-125, 314-320). On the other hand, it is surprising that Greek texts are undeniably emphasized at the expense of the second language in bilingual inscriptions. In some cases, this is a minor inconvenience, as in the case of a bilingual Greek and Hebrew inscription: the Greek presents a simple funerary inscription listing several names; the Hebrew, however, is not transcribed and it is not clear if it included anything beyond the names of the deceased individuals (no. 26). Similarly, a mosaic from Mas'udije in Mesopotamia includes the signature of the workman in Greek, below which are two lines in Syriac letters mentioned in the lemma to the inscription, but not transcribed, transliterated, translated or otherwise treated; one might assume that the Syriac is simply a translation of the Greek signature, but this is not made clear (no. 32; cf. no. 25). Furthermore, only the Greek inscription on an altar containing both a Greek text and an Assyrian text is presented (no. 65). De Rossi comments that the Assyrian inscription is a dedication by Salmanassar III to the Seven Gods, but no transcription, transliteration or translation is provided. This absence is particularly notable in light of De Rossi's hope, expressed in the Introduction, that this catalogue will serve as an introduction to "the history of Hellenism in these most distant places, whether through its colonies or through its cultural influence" (p. xvi): cultural influence is to be observed both in the presence of Greek texts and in the persistence of local texts and reuse of older stones... Vazhdon -> http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2005/2005-10-13.html