"Moreover, you scorned our people, and compared the Albanese to sheep, and according to your custom think of us with insults. Nor have you shown yourself to have any knowledge of my race. Our elders were Epirotes, where this Pirro came from, whose force could scarcely support the Romans. This Pirro, who Taranto and many other places of Italy held back with armies. I do not have to speak for the Epiroti. They are very much stronger men than your Tarantini, a species of wet men who are born only to fish. If you want to say that Albania is part of Macedonia I would concede that a lot more of our ancestors were nobles who went as far as India under Alexander the Great and defeated all those peoples with incredible difficulty. From those men come these who you called sheep. But the nature of things is not changed. Why do your men run away in the faces of sheep?"
Letter from Skanderbeg to the Prince of Taranto ▬ Skanderbeg, October 31 1460

The so-called loans of Latin in the Greek language.

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Zeus10
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The so-called loans of Latin in the Greek language.

#1

Post by Zeus10 » Sun Oct 25, 2009 2:59 pm

I was looking at Britannica Encyclopedia about the grammatical development of the greek language and among other I found the presumed ""Latin" loans in the mediaevel Greek, which in fact are not Latin at all, but Albanian:
Most of the phonological and grammatical developments that separate present-day Greek from the Koine occurred during this period. Thus, in the phonology the two high front vowels /i/ and /ü/ were merged, simplifying the six-vowel system to the five-vowel system of Modern Greek. In the morphology the frequent misuse of the dative case of nouns shows that it went out of use in the spoken language, and the infinitive was replaced by various periphrastic constructions. (Periphrastic constructions involve the use of function words and auxiliaries.) In the earlier period numerous words (mostly Latin) were imported: the chronicler Malalas has (in their modern form) pórta ‘door,’ kámbos ‘plain,’ saíta ‘arrow,’ paláti ‘palace,’ spíti ‘house’ (from hospitium), and hundreds of other borrowings, not all of which have survived. The later period is characterized by the richness of its compound words, usually from native roots. Some of these, such as the compounds in which a modifying noun precedes its head noun, continued ancient patterns (thalassóvrakhi ‘sea rock,’ vunópulo ‘mountain lad’); coordinative compounds of the type common in Modern Greek, though rare in earlier periods, are also found (aristódhipnon ‘lunch and dinner,’ compare Modern Greek andróyino ‘man and wife,’ makheropíruna ‘knives and forks’). Semantic shift was another source of innovation: álogho ‘horse,’ previously meant ‘irrational’; skiázome ‘I fear,’ earlier meant ‘I am in shadow’; and (u)dhén ‘not,’ meant, in Classical Greek, ‘nothing.

Let's take a look at them:

pórta ‘door,’--> is the Albanian word porta

kámbos ‘plain,---> is the Albanian word kamba(leg)

’ saíta ‘arrow,’ --> is a corruption of the Albanian shigjeta

paláti ‘palace,’--> is the Albanian word pallati

spíti ‘house’ --> is the Albanian word shpi or shtëpi
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Re: The so-called loans of Latin in the Greek language.

#2

Post by jay_albania_fan » Sun Oct 25, 2009 4:33 pm

Zeus10 wrote:I was lookinG at Britannica Encyclopedia about the grammatical development of the greek language, and among other I found the presumed ""Latin" loans in the mediaevel Greek, which in fact are not Latin at all, but Albanian:
Most of the phonological and grammatical developments that separate present-day Greek from the Koine occurred during this period. Thus, in the phonology the two high front vowels /i/ and /ü/ were merged, simplifying the six-vowel system to the five-vowel system of Modern Greek. In the morphology the frequent misuse of the dative case of nouns shows that it went out of use in the spoken language, and the infinitive was replaced by various periphrastic constructions. (Periphrastic constructions involve the use of function words and auxiliaries.) In the earlier period numerous words (mostly Latin) were imported: the chronicler Malalas has (in their modern form) pórta ‘door,’ kámbos ‘plain,’ saíta ‘arrow,’ paláti ‘palace,’ spíti ‘house’ (from hospitium), and hundreds of other borrowings, not all of which have survived. The later period is characterized by the richness of its compound words, usually from native roots. Some of these, such as the compounds in which a modifying noun precedes its head noun, continued ancient patterns (thalassóvrakhi ‘sea rock,’ vunópulo ‘mountain lad’); coordinative compounds of the type common in Modern Greek, though rare in earlier periods, are also found (aristódhipnon ‘lunch and dinner,’ compare Modern Greek andróyino ‘man and wife,’ makheropíruna ‘knives and forks’). Semantic shift was another source of innovation: álogho ‘horse,’ previously meant ‘irrational’; skiázome ‘I fear,’ earlier meant ‘I am in shadow’; and (u)dhén ‘not,’ meant, in Classical Greek, ‘nothing.

Let's take a look at them:

pórta ‘door,’--> is the Albanian word porta

kámbos ‘plain,---> is the Albanian word kamba(leg)

’ saíta ‘arrow,’ --> is a corruption of the Albanian shigjeta

paláti ‘palace,’--> is the Albanian word pallati

spíti ‘house’ --> is the Albanian word shpi or shtëpi
It looks like some of the words did get loaned into Greek via Albanian. The Latin word is campus from which Greek would have borrowed the term. The Latin word for palace came from Mons Palatinus, one of the seven hills of Rome. This is where the palace of Emperor Augustus was located. The word Palatinus itself is of unknown etymology. Albanian would have borrowed this term from Latin and in turn Greek borrowed it from Albanian. I will have to read more of saita and spiti.
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Re: The so-called loans of Latin in the Greek language.

#3

Post by Orakulli » Sun Nov 22, 2009 1:37 am

Albanian haven’t borrowed this term from Latin or Grek.
The “palatine hill” that in Latin was “Mons Palatinus” and “Athena”,and “Berat” come from the albanaian language.
Palatinus,Berat,Athena have to do with the concept “ba lart”=”make high”.
The old testament uses the verb “parah” in the connection with plant and trees. The Old testament uses this verb “parah” as a metaphor for growing. The is used also in “malam partem” .
That is used in the phrase “I bring low the high tree. I make high the low tree…
Very interested is the name used in the old testament “hiphil”.
Parah,malam partem,Hiphill means generally the same “make high”. In Albanian language they mean respectively:e para,i par,mal ber,hip ill(yll).
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