"Moreover, you scorned our people, and compared the Albanese to sheep, and according to your custom think of us with insults. Nor have you shown yourself to have any knowledge of my race. Our elders were Epirotes, where this Pirro came from, whose force could scarcely support the Romans. This Pirro, who Taranto and many other places of Italy held back with armies. I do not have to speak for the Epiroti. They are very much stronger men than your Tarantini, a species of wet men who are born only to fish. If you want to say that Albania is part of Macedonia I would concede that a lot more of our ancestors were nobles who went as far as India under Alexander the Great and defeated all those peoples with incredible difficulty. From those men come these who you called sheep. But the nature of things is not changed. Why do your men run away in the faces of sheep?"
Letter from Skanderbeg to the Prince of Taranto ▬ Skanderbeg, October 31 1460

I just awoke to the real Aphrodite.

Talk about the languages.
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jay_albania_fan
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I just awoke to the real Aphrodite.

#1

Post by jay_albania_fan » Tue Oct 27, 2009 9:17 pm

I often don't like etymologies of personal names due to their lack of known etymology. Yet, there is one name which now I think I know the true etymology. The name Aphroditē is of unknown etymology or should I say there are various theories. As all of you know I do not like folk etymologies so I am going to tackle this using real linguistics.

The most credible explanation for Greek Aphroditē is that Greek borrowed the word from the Albanian Afërditë. Here is why. Ancient Greek "ph" is a voiceless aspirated bilabial stop. Greek did not have an "f" until much later (which developed from ph) during the early AD years. Albanian by this time likely did, but since Greek did not, it approximated the nearest sound it had to "f" which is "ph". The two components of Albanian Afërditë are well-known, afër (near) + ditë (day). As well, ditë is an Indo-European root so its etymology goes back 5,000+ years. The meaning of afër and ditë makes perfect sense "near day", the morning star which in English we call Venus.

The theories that Greek loaned it via Phoenician do not work out phonologically at all. I have seen some other possible etymologies of Aphroditē using other IE roots, but they aren't quite as strong in meaning.

Albanian zot still causes me issues. Linguistics are divided on it. It may be a cognate with Greek Zeus, remember though Ancient Greek Zeus was pronounced /zdeus/. Demiraj has Albanian zot and Greek Zeus as cognates coming from PIE *deywo-. In addition it is *deywo + Albanian atë (father). Others see Albanian zot coming from PIE *wik'+pot- meaning Master of the House. I prefer the first etymology as the second one requires a lot more sound changes.
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Re: I just awoke to the real Aphrodite.

#2

Post by Zeus10 » Tue Oct 27, 2009 9:53 pm

It's funny because the folk etymology Ἀφροδίτη= apʰɾo + díːtɛː
where ἀφρός =foam and δίτη= presumely meaning dive or diver, which is completely missing in the Ancient Greek:

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doesn't make sense at all and is a pure speculation.
Even the row where presumely mentioned afrogenea, is missing in the ""original"" text and has been vaguely reconstructed:

ἐκ δ' ἔβη αἰδοίη καλὴ θεός, ἀμφὶ δὲ ποίη
ποσσὶν ὕπο ῥαδινοῖσιν ἀέξετο: τὴν δ' Ἀφροδίτην
[ἀφρογενέα τε θεὰν καὶ ἐυστέφανον Κυθέρειαν ]
κικλῄσκουσι θεοί τε καὶ ἀνέρες, οὕνεκ' ἐν ἀφρῷ
θρέφθη: ἀτὰρ Κυθέρειαν, ὅτι προσέκυρσε Κυθήροις:
Κυπρογενέα δ', ὅτι γέντο πολυκλύστῳ ἐνὶ Κύπρῳ:
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

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Re: I just awoke to the real Aphrodite.

#3

Post by Arta » Wed Oct 28, 2009 12:15 am

ariadne wrote:I disagree. So more than 2000 years ago the words in ancient albanian would be "afer" and "dita" without the slightest change??
The "foam" theory is not just a folk etymology, it is where she got her name. The goddes was formed by the foam of the sea. She happens to be the most ancient greek deity btw.
Zeus, this question was brought by one of the members at Alb.com, can you give it a better description how it use to be in ancient Albanian?
"I never gave anybody hell! I just told the truth and they thought it was hell."~Harry S. Truman

jay_albania_fan
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Re: I just awoke to the real Aphrodite.

#4

Post by jay_albania_fan » Wed Oct 28, 2009 12:27 am

Arta wrote:
ariadne wrote:I disagree. So more than 2000 years ago the words in ancient albanian would be "afer" and "dita" without the slightest change??
The "foam" theory is not just a folk etymology, it is where she got her name. The goddes was formed by the foam of the sea. She happens to be the most ancient greek deity btw.
Zeus, this question was brought by one of the members at Alb.com, can you give it a better description how it use to be in ancient Albanian?
I posted a reply on there. This is because PIE *t and *d have remained the same in Albanian. This is why that word has not changed practically 5,000 years.
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Re: I just awoke to the real Aphrodite.

#5

Post by Zeus10 » Wed Oct 28, 2009 12:57 am

Arta wrote:
ariadne wrote:I disagree. So more than 2000 years ago the words in ancient albanian would be "afer" and "dita" without the slightest change??
The "foam" theory is not just a folk etymology, it is where she got her name. The goddes was formed by the foam of the sea. She happens to be the most ancient greek deity btw.
Zeus, this question was brought by one of the members at Alb.com, can you give it a better description how it use to be in ancient Albanian?
I have given detailed explanation here:

http://www.arberiaonline.com/viewtopic. ... 5483#p5483

Jay has made a very good job also. I beleive only his explanation is more than enough to enjoye Ariadne, but I am afraid he/she can't understand such concepts in linguistics.
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

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Re: I just awoke to the real Aphrodite.

#6

Post by Arta » Wed Oct 28, 2009 1:16 am

Zeus10 wrote:
Arta wrote:
ariadne wrote:I disagree. So more than 2000 years ago the words in ancient albanian would be "afer" and "dita" without the slightest change??
The "foam" theory is not just a folk etymology, it is where she got her name. The goddes was formed by the foam of the sea. She happens to be the most ancient greek deity btw.
Zeus, this question was brought by one of the members at Alb.com, can you give it a better description how it use to be in ancient Albanian?
I have given detailed explanation here:

http://www.arberiaonline.com/viewtopic. ... 5483#p5483

Jay has made a very good job also. I beleive only his explanation is more than enough to enjoye Ariadne, but I am afraid he/she can't understand such concepts in linguistics.

Thanks, yes I read Jay's explanation and I agree.
"I never gave anybody hell! I just told the truth and they thought it was hell."~Harry S. Truman

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