"Moreover, you scorned our people, and compared the Albanese to sheep, and according to your custom think of us with insults. Nor have you shown yourself to have any knowledge of my race. Our elders were Epirotes, where this Pirro came from, whose force could scarcely support the Romans. This Pirro, who Taranto and many other places of Italy held back with armies. I do not have to speak for the Epiroti. They are very much stronger men than your Tarantini, a species of wet men who are born only to fish. If you want to say that Albania is part of Macedonia I would concede that a lot more of our ancestors were nobles who went as far as India under Alexander the Great and defeated all those peoples with incredible difficulty. From those men come these who you called sheep. But the nature of things is not changed. Why do your men run away in the faces of sheep?"
Letter from Skanderbeg to the Prince of Taranto ▬ Skanderbeg, October 31 1460

SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

Këtu mund të flisni mbi historinë tonë duke sjellë fakte historike për ndriçimin e asaj pjese të historisë mbi të cilen ka rënë harresa e kohës dhe e njerëzve.

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#46

Post by Mallakastrioti » Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:47 am

The terrific register: or, Record of crimes, judgments, providences, and ...-Published by Sherwood,Jones-1825.

DREADFUL DESTRUCTION OF THEIR INFANTS BY THE
WOMEN OF SULI.

The pople of the mountains of Suli, who, from their wild and secluded situation, had acquired all the characters of a distinct tribe, inhabited ten or twelve large villages, the principal of which was distant about a mile from the modern Seraglio. They were Albanians in origin, belonging to the division of the people called the Tzamides. While many of their countrymen had become Mahometans, the Suliotes retained the Christian religion, but in a rudeness of form accordant with the manner in which they lived. Their number probably never exceeded 12,000, of whom between three and four thousand were capable of bearing arms. The peculiarities of their situation gave a wildness and masculine daring to their character which distinguished them from the other Albanian tribes. The Suliote women partook the dangers of war with their husbands, and bore together with them the miseries which their community afterwards suffered. It is related as an anecdote, that at one of the fountains of Suli, the females settled the precedence in drawing water, according to the respective bravery their husbands had displayed in battle ; and in the progress of the war with Ali Pasha, some of their number displayed a fearless resolution, which could not easily be surpassed by the other sex.

In noticing, however, this feature of the Suliotes, it is necessary to add, that it was in some measure the bravery of a band of robbers, organized into social life, continuing their character through successive generations, and combining some generous qualities with their rapine and ferocity of habit. They were the terror of the southern part of Albania; and the descent of the Suliotes from their mountain-fastnesses, for the sake of plunder or vengeance, was a general signal of alarm to the surrounding country. The region of Suli was itself rarely approached either by friend or enemy, and had never been subdued by the Turkish power in Albania. The ambitious spirit of Ali Pasha could not tolerate the vicinity of a people who insulted his authority, and pursued their predatory excursions, even into the plains surrounding his capital. His first efforts against them were comparatively feeble, and only very partially successful. As his power increased, his hostility became more formidable, but was still diverted at intervals by the other enterprizes he was carrying on. Year after year an irregular warfare continued, many of the details of which, though in themselves of little importance, are carefully preserved in the Albanian songs.
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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#47

Post by Mallakastrioti » Sun Feb 14, 2010 3:09 pm

Nga libri:Canti popolari albanesi: tradizionalei nel mezzogiorno d'Italia; riordinati ... (1889)-auotor Demetrio de Grazia

Citohet(duke hedhur poshte tezat qe nuk pati nje beslidhje midis sulioteve dhe Aliut)

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Perkthim:

" E shkelqyer eshte zgjidhja me te cilen Suliotet,qe u kthyen ne trojet e tyre midis nje traktati me Vezirin(Aliun),qe i kerkonin zbatimin e gjithe premtiveve te tij:"Ne besojme te kemi te drejte te qahemi,pasi kurre nuk munguam fjales se dhene(BESES) dhe asnje premtimi cfare do qofte ajo.I mbahemi besnik fjales qe te kemi dhene qe u betuam mbi Ungjill:duam te jemi aleatet e tu dhe te bashkpunojme deri ne shporrjen e Turqeve,qe urrejme sikur mekatet tona.Por Trimat tane protestojne qe,duke mos pasur atdhe,qe tu jepet Qafa,duke pritur pergjigjen tende per te vendosur kunder ciles ane do kthejne armet."

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#48

Post by Mallakastrioti » Sun Feb 14, 2010 5:09 pm

Researches in the highlands of Turkey; including visits to mounts Ida, Athos, Olympus, and Pelion, to the Mirdite Albanians, and other remote tribes (1869)
Author: Tozer, Henry Fanshawe, 1829-1916


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-waiting- C'thote ky ore c'thote?...kush punonte token aty?...greket punonin token dhe suliotet shqiptare i mbronin siç benin Spartanet!?
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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#49

Post by alfeko sukaraku » Sun Feb 14, 2010 9:51 pm

nuk e besoj se prifti came e ndonje tjeter qe u shkollua ne greqisht do ja arrinte te punonte te gjitha tokat e cameris edhe te quheshin grek.

suliotet luftuan per intersin e tyre edhe per te ruajtur pozicionin e rendesishem gjeografik ne "qafa" e ne "kuqi", edhe per kete pozicion u sulmuan nga ali pash tepelena.eshte fakte i pakundershtueshem qe ata kishin vendosur influencen e vete ne fushat e thesalis ..edhe qe thesalet i ftonin per ti mbrojtur me kembim drithin,por kjo behej pertej kufinjve te epirit..tokat e tyre i punonin vete sepse nuk kishte grek nder ta
KOHA ESHTE E MASKARENJVE/POR ATDHEU I SHQIPETRAVE

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#50

Post by pirro » Mon Feb 15, 2010 12:37 am

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#51

Post by pirro » Mon Feb 15, 2010 9:53 pm

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#52

Post by ALBPelasgian » Mon Feb 15, 2010 11:43 pm

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THE SULIOT HILLS,
Albania.

Is a former article we gave a brief illustration of the wretched system which prevails in the government of Turkey, in regard to the appointment and subsequent conduct of the Pachas ; and followed up our remarks, by an account of the Pachalic of Joannina, in its topographical and commercial features. As it is our intention, to present, from time to time, such sketches as w.ll illustrate Turkey and the Turks in their most interesting point of view, we will avail ourselves of the present opportunity to give an account of the Suliots, a brave but persecuted band of men, who, living under the Pacha of Joannina, may be deemed subjects of the Turkish Empire. A description of the small district known as the Suliot Hills will be necessary to a due appreciation of the history of the tribe.
At a distance of a few miles south-west from the city of Joannina are the Suliot Hills, among which four villages, named Suli, Avarico, Kiaffa, and Samoniva, are Jie chief seats of this tribe; but as circumstances, which we shall detail in the next paper, have made sad changes in the condition of the Suliots; we will describe their home and their customs as they existed a few years ago. The four villages were situated on a plain elevated 2000 Vol. XVIH.
feet above the neighbouring river, Acheron; with a perpendicular cliff descending to the river on one side, and a chain of lofty mountains on the other. From the banks of the river, a winding and intricate path led up to the villages; and this path was at intervals commanded by strong forts, so that the Suliot plain formed one of the most inaccessible spots in Europe. Here the Suliots dwelt, and cherished that love of liberty which so often distinguishes mountaineers. Among these men were seen some of the finest of human forms; and their continual exposure to sun and wind had given to their complexion a swarthy tint, not unsuited to our ideas of a brave and vigorous people. When they left their villages on warlike expeditions, they took no tents with them; they slept on their own capotes, or cloaks, and had the sky for a canopy. The greater part of them were almost born soldiers, for they wore arms from a very early age; and their bravery was so well known and appreciated, that a real Suliot was regarded by his neighbours in somewhat the same light as the ancient Spartans were by the rest of the Greeks.
The Suliots were Christians belonging to the Greek church, the same faith to which the Russians belong; and this circumstance has led to much correspondence and treaty between the Greeks and the Russians, during the struggle of the former to shake off the Turkish
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yoke. The Suliots, when their little republic was still entire, had no written laws; but many customs, handed down frqpi time immemorial, served to regulate their conduct. The date of their establishment among these hills is placed by tradition in the 17th century, when some goat and swine herds, having led their animals to feed upon the heights of Kiaffa, were struck with the eligibility of the situation, and occupied it with their families. It is, however, the opinion of Mr. Hughes, that the mountains afforded refuge to some of those Albanians who fled from Turkish despotism after the death of Scanderbeg.
By whatever mode the district became peopled, the villages themselves were exceedingly simple: the houses were low, and rudely built, and no attempts were anywhere made at display. The life which the men led, when not actually engaged at war, was simple and hardy; and to aid in forming the character of the men to bravery and fearlessness, the women had precedence at the wells and fountains according to the character which their husbands bore for bravery; and if a woman happened to be married to a man of a weak and cowardly mind, she was obliged to stand at the well's side till the rest of the women had filled their pitchers. The effect of this custom was, that the men could more easily brave the enemy than the reproaches which were poured on them by their wives, if the latter had been subject to this ignominious treatment. The females were held in the highest esteem; and a curious law is mentioned by travellers, that no man was allowed, under the severest penalties, to interfere in the women's quarrels, lest by accident a woman might be killed; and that whoever committed murder on a woman was put to death with the execrations of his fellow men, not only as a murderer, but as a patricide.
Although the chief seat of this tribe was in the four villages which we have mentioned, yet there were numerous others gradually incorporated: with one another. A century or two back, the tribe had attained sufficient importance to draw the attention of the neighbouring chiefs, and to carry on war with the Beys of Paramithia and Margariti, and with the Pachas of Joannina and Arta. The almost inaccessible and impregnable nature of their position effectually shielded them from attack from without, while the boldness and bravery of the mountaineers enabled them to take numerous possessions from the hands of their opponents, and gradually to extend their little republic. At one time it consisted of sixty-six villages, containing several thousand inhabitants. These inhabitants were divided into sections called faras, each fara containing a certain number of families, commanded by a chief or captain:—thus, just previous to Ali Pacha's war with the Suliots, the village of Suli, (from which they derived their appellation,) contained nineteen faras, and four hundred and twentyfive families: Kiaffa, four faras, and sixty families; Avarico, three faras, and fifty-five families; and Samoniva, three faras, and thirty families. The sixty-six villages of which we have spoken were considered as tributary or conquered possessions, and the inhabitants were not admitted to the rights of citizenship. Of the subordination in which they were held by the Suliots of the four federal villages, an example was given in the following incident:—on one occasion, the inhabitants of the four towns having increased beyond the means of subsistence, a certain number of them was quartered or colonized in seven of the tributary villages, where they were exempted from paying either forced contributions, or the regular tribute which the other inhabitants of those villages paid, and which amounted to one tenth of all produce.
In the few and simple judicial matters which had to engage their attention, the judge was either the captain of the fara in which the matter in dispute occurred; or in more important affairs, a council of chiefs assembled
from all the four towns at Suli, and decided the matter. But warlike deeds were the chief employment of the tribe, as they are of most infant states. The Suliots had a band of one thousand chosen troops, calledpalikars, all citizens of the four towns; as well as fifteen hundred troops levied from the dependent villages. Their mode of warfare was such as is customary among a people but little advanced in the arts of civilized life; that is, it consisted more in skirmishes than in pitched battles—in daring expeditions, sudden attacks, and quick retreats. It is said, that they had a rather extraordinary custom in their wars, of sending out a small body of troops against a superior force; and, on the contrary, a large body against a small one: in the first instance, they intimidated their foes, who knew they were prepared to conquer or to perish on the field of battle; in the latter, they were able to secure more prisoners, and gain a larger ransom for the purchase of arms and ammunition.
Martial exercises formed the chief education of this rude but vigorous people. Their amusements, the dance and the song, were calculated, the one to contribute to the increase of their bodily strength, and the latter to warm their national enthusiasm, which was one of the chief traits in their character. The Suliot women contributed very powerfully to the maintenance of a martial spirit among the men, not only by the custom at the wells and fountains, to which we before alluded, but also by their readiness to share all the hardships and perils of war with their husbands : troops of women attended upon the soldiers, to carry provisions and ammunition, to assist the wounded, and even in some cases to engage in the battles:—these characteristics strongly remind us of the state of manners and customs among the ancient Spartans.
This description of the Suliot villages,—the institutions which bound the inhabitants into a fraternity, and the manners and customs of the two sexes,—must be considered as applying to a period forty or fifty years ago. Since then sad reverses have occurred: families have been rooted out after a desperate resistance; villages have been burned to the ground; and the Suliots have been for forty years a scattered people. The circumstances which led to these results will be briefly detailed in the next article on this subject.
Ne sot po hedhim faren me emrin Bashkim,
Qe neser te korrim frutin me emrin Bashkim!

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#53

Post by ALBPelasgian » Mon Feb 15, 2010 11:53 pm

Miranda Vickers, historiane bashkohore

'The Suliots, then numbering around 12,000, were Christian Albanians
inhabiting a small indepedent community somewhat akin to that of the
Cahtolic Mirdite trive to the north. The Suliots dwelt in a wild,
inaccessible cluster of villages on a plateau near Arta, about two
thousand feet above the river Acheron.

http://books.google.com/books?id=IzI0uO ... q=&f=false

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Ne sot po hedhim faren me emrin Bashkim,
Qe neser te korrim frutin me emrin Bashkim!

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#54

Post by ALBPelasgian » Mon Feb 15, 2010 11:59 pm

Suliots ; a mixed people of Arnaout and Greek descent, speaking the Arnaout and the Romaic dialects. They derive their origin from Aruaout and Grechui shepherds, who, in the seventeenth century, settled in the Cassiopeiau mountains, occupying a wild valley, enclosed on three sides by almost inaccessible mountains, and accessible on the fourth only by a narrow defile. Here their numbers hud increased, towards the end of the lost century, to 10,000souls, in seventy villages, of which Suli or Souli was the capital of the district. The Suliots are of the Greek church ; their government was republican. They are brave, hardy, active, resolute and faithful. When, after a struggle of twelve years, All Pacha (q. v.) hud rather reduced them to despair limn conquered them (1803), they aliandoned their country, and entered the service of the powers who had possession of the Ionian Islands. But when Ali found himself hard pressed by the Turks and deserted by the Albanians, he recalled the Suliots to his assistance. Their brave leader, Marco Hotzaris, gained some brilliant successes ; but the tyrant, who trusted neither the Suliots nor the other Greeks, ptu-ished in 1822. The Albanians then joined the Turks; but the Suliots remained true to the cause of Grecian liberty. Suli, however, was reduced by famine, Sept. 4, 1822, and 3000 Suliots cmlmrked in English ships for Ceplmlonia : the rest dispersed themselves in the mountains. The younger Marco Bot/ans, son of the abovementioned leader of the same нами-, threw himself into Miraolonghi, which 1m successfully defended, and alicrwanls fell ¡it <'iirpiuit/.i. (See Greffe, Revolution ';/".) His uncle, NotoBotzaris,dt-fcnili'd Missolonghi in lf'¿G. (See Missulnnsflii.) The corps of 500 men, raised and equipped by lord Byron ¡i! his own expense, was composed of Suliots, for whom he had a great admiration. (See Ki/ron.)

http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA46&d ... utput=text
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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#55

Post by ALBPelasgian » Tue Feb 16, 2010 12:06 am

"The Suliots were a Christian Albanian tribe, which in the eighteenth century settled in a mountainous area close to the town..."
http://www.jstor.org/pss/881312
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Qe neser te korrim frutin me emrin Bashkim!

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#56

Post by ALBPelasgian » Tue Feb 16, 2010 12:10 am

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kurse Thesprotia (Çamëria) krahina e Suliotëve:

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Ne sot po hedhim faren me emrin Bashkim,
Qe neser te korrim frutin me emrin Bashkim!

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#57

Post by ALBPelasgian » Tue Feb 16, 2010 12:10 am

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Ne sot po hedhim faren me emrin Bashkim,
Qe neser te korrim frutin me emrin Bashkim!

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#58

Post by ALBPelasgian » Tue Feb 16, 2010 12:11 am

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Ne sot po hedhim faren me emrin Bashkim,
Qe neser te korrim frutin me emrin Bashkim!

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#59

Post by ALBPelasgian » Tue Feb 16, 2010 12:28 am

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Ne sot po hedhim faren me emrin Bashkim,
Qe neser te korrim frutin me emrin Bashkim!

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Re: SULI dhe banoret e tij Shqiptare

#60

Post by ALBPelasgian » Tue Feb 16, 2010 12:29 am

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Ne sot po hedhim faren me emrin Bashkim,
Qe neser te korrim frutin me emrin Bashkim!

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